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Posts Tagged ‘Suzanne Tomatore’

Panel on “Children Migrating Alone and the Trafficking Victims Protection Act”

Update: Register for this event!  See “Children Should Not Have to Choose between Being Trafficked or Extreme Violence” or “The Freedom Network’s Response to the Current Influx of Unaccompanied Children to the U.S.-Mexico Border

NYATN, Committee on Immigration & Nationality Law, Council on Children, and the City Bar Justice Center are co-sponsoring “Children Migrating Alone and the Trafficking Victims Protection Act,” a panel on Wednesday, October 29 at 6 pm.  This will be a panel discussion on the intersections of unaccompanied youth and human trafficking.  Space is limited, so kindly RSVP by October 24, 2014 to lberger@nycbar.org with your name and organization.

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Panel: “Children Migrating Alone & The Trafficking Victims Protection Act”

In light of the recent influx of unaccompanied children arriving at our southern border, the City Bar Justice Center’s Immigrant Women and Children Project will host a panel discussion on the intersections of unaccompanied youth and human trafficking. While some have looked to the Trafficking Victims Protection Act as a source of the recent surge in the migration of children, others counter that the law is in place to enhance their protection. The panelists will discuss their work with unaccompanied youth and victims of human trafficking, best practices for screening, and recent developments.  NYATN steering member Suzanne Tomatore will moderate.  Read more….

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

6-9 pm

Please sign in to register at www.nycbar.org

NYATN’s Suzanne Tomatore quoted in “Labor Trafficking Persists Amid Outrage Over Sex Trade”

NYATN steering member Suzanne Tomatore is quoted in City Limits’Labor Trafficking Persists Amid Outrage Over Sex Trade.”  Tomatore says, in part: “[Human trafficking survivors] have a sense that a crime was committed against them and that they’ve been deceived, manipulated and abused. They come to us for other reasons such as domestic violence or they’re trying to get help with immigration status. In talking to them, we identify initial trafficking to the United States. Sometimes our claimants have been in the United States for many years and were trafficked later.”  A report from Tomatore’s agency, the City Bar Justice Center’s Immigrant Women and Children Project, shows: “Out of the 150 human trafficking cases, 54.6 percent involved labor trafficking and 45.3 percent involved sex trafficking. Domestic work was the most frequently reported form of labor trafficking, representing nearly 80 percent of the cases.”  Read more….

Labor Trafficking Panel at Fordham Law School

Fordham Law School’s Law Students Against Trafficking will have a Labor Trafficking Panel on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 at 12:30 pm to provide “an informative look into labor trafficking – the slavery that produces the goods and provides the services we use.”  Speakers will include:

  • Leah Obias, Damayan Migrant Workers Association
  • Ivy O. Suriyopas, Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund
  • Suzanne Tomatore, Immigrant Women & Children Project at the City Bar Justice Center

City Bar Justice Center Releases Special Report on 150 Human Trafficking Cases

NYATN member City Bar Justice Center’s Immigrant Women & Children Project (IWC) released a special report, “Spotlight on 150 Human Trafficking Cases.”  This report reflects over a decade of direct representation of low-income immigrant survivors of human trafficking in the New York City metropolitan area and informs the Justice Center’s advocacy and policy recommendations.  The report states, in part, “Of the 150 human trafficking cases, 54.6% involved labor trafficking and 45.3% involved sex trafficking. Domestic work was by far the most frequently reported form of labor trafficking, representing nearly 80% of the labor trafficking cases.”  Read more….

NYATN is Co-sponsoring a Panel on “New Trends in Human Trafficking: Legislative, Victim Advocacy and Prosecutorial Updates”

On October 30th, the City Bar Justice Center will host a panel, “New Trends in Human Trafficking: Legislative, Victim Advocacy and Prosecutorial Updates,” from 6 to 8 pm.

Featured speakers include:

Sienna Baskin, Co-Director of the Sex Workers Project at the Urban Justice Center

Laura Matthews-Jolly, Staff Attorney at Immigrant Women & Children Project at the City Bar Justice Center

Kate Mogulescu, Supervising Attorney of Trafficking Victims Advocacy Project at the Legal Aid Society

John Temple, Attorney-in-Charge of Human Trafficking Program at the Manhattan DA’s Office

Moderated by Suzanne Tomatore, Director of the Immigrant Women & Children Project at the City Bar Justice Center

Space is limited.  Kindly RSVP by October 25, 2013 with your name and your organization to lmatthews-jolly@nycbar.org.  For more details….

NYATN will speak at the People’s Global Action on Migration, Development & Human Rights at the United Nations

On October 3, 2013 at 3 pm, members of NYATN will speak at the People’s Global Action on Migration, Development & Human Rights at the United Nations.

Unpacking the Migration/Trafficking Nexus: A Critique of Criminalization and Law-Enforcement Responses to Trafficking in Persons

At the international level and in many States, the legal response to trafficking in persons is focused on criminal justice and law enforcement, at the expense of human rights and the rights and well being of the victims of trafficking. Law enforcement tactics such as raids often frighten the people they are intended to help (by removing them from coercive situations), and often result in detention and ultimately, deportation. Increasingly, human rights defenders and activists worldwide are calling attention to anti-trafficking measures are not only not effective, they are leading to further human rights violations – of people who are trafficked and other workers and migrants who are caught up in the anti-trafficking response. It is critical that anti-trafficking measures put the needs of the people they are intended to protect first.

This session will explore analysis of the human rights impact of anti-trafficking programmes that are focused on a law-enforcement response rather than a human rights response. It will look at what we need to learn from survivors of trafficking and explore strategies by which we can support all actors in the anti-trafficking response – to stop the emphasis on “doing more” and instead focus on “doing well” and actually address the needs of trafficking survivors and others affected by anti-trafficking laws and policies, not just the hype.

Speakers:

  • Bandana Pattanaik, Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women-International Secretariat, Bangkok
  • Sienna Baskin, Sex Workers Project, at the Urban Justice Center, New York
  • Avaloy Lanning, Safe Horizon, New York
  • Florrie Burke, Freedom Network USA, Chair Emeritus
  • Ivy O. Suriyopas, Anti-Trafficking Initiative, Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF), and Co-chair, Freedom Network USA
  • Suzanne Tomatore, Immigrant Women & Children Project City Bar Justice Center, New York, and Co-chair, Freedom Network USA

Sponsors

Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women (GAATW)

WGMWG

United Methodist Women

Flyer for the event….

More details….

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