NYATN Receives Awesome Without Borders Grant

NY Anti-Trafficking Network is so excited and grateful for our Awesome Without Borders grant from The Harnisch Foundation. This grant allows us to create two more #TalkTraffic videos on important anti-trafficking issues. Coming soon!

Human Rights and Economic Opportunity Will End Trafficking

One of NYATN’s founders and Steering Committee member, Juhu Thukral, wrote a journal article in the Anti-Trafficking Review. Here is a short preview:

Response to ATR Debate Proposition: ‘Prosecuting trafficking deflects attention from much more important responses and is anyway a waste of time and money’

This statement by the editors of this issue on the place of prosecution in ending human trafficking is of course hyperbolic, but it points to a basic truth about different strategies to protect human rights around the world. The ultimate goal in any anti-trafficking work should be twofold: preventing trafficking from happening in the first place; and helping survivors reclaim their voices and their lives so they can define how they want to move forward. Engaged audiences care about trafficking as a global issue and find it horrifying because it violates a shared hope—dignity for all people—and the communal belief that everyone deserves a chance to thrive and seek opportunity in life. To continue, please click here.

Please cite this article as: J Thukral, ‘Human Rights and Economic Opportunity Will End Trafficking’, Anti-Trafficking Review, issue 6, 2016, pp. 134–137 issue 6, 2016, pp. 130–133, www.antitraffickingreview.org.

The Anti-Trafficking Review promotes a human rights-based approach to anti-trafficking. It explores trafficking in its broader context including gender analyses and intersections with labour and migrant rights.

 

The Intersection of Immigration and Criminal Justice for Women, Girls, and Transgender People

Juhu Thukral of NYATN’s Steering Committee wrote a piece for the Vera Institute’s blog on gender and justice, on the dangerous intersection of the criminal justice and immigration legal systems, with particular impact on women, girls, and trans people. You can check it out here.

Women’s Rights in Sustainable Development: The New Legal Frontiers

NYATN Steering Committee member Suzanne Tomatore will be speaking on a panel entitled “Women’s Rights in Sustainable Development: The New Legal Frontiers” which will take place during the second week of the 60th Session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW60). The event is free and no pass is necessary. Speakers include Hon. Abike Dabiri-Erewa, Senior Special Assistant to the President of Nigeria on Foreign Affairs and the Diaspora, Prof. Cynthia Soohoo, Director, Human Rights and Gender Justice Clinic, CUNY School of Law, HE Mrs. Toyin Saraki, Founder and Director, The Wellbeing Foundation of Africa, Deborah Enix-Ross, Chair, Business and Human Rights Project of the ABA Center for Human Rights, and Suzanne Tomatore, Director, Immigrant Women & Children Project, City Bar Justice Center. The panel will take place on March 24, 2016 from 8:30 AM-10:00 AM at the Church Center for the United Nations, 2nd fl., 777 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017.

The event is sponsored by the American Bar Association Section of International Law, Section of International Law Women’s Interest Network, Section of International Law NGO & Not-for-Profit Organizations Committee and Transnational Legal Practice Committee.

Human Rights and Trafficking in Persons: Empowering Women to Address Poverty

Please save the date for our upcoming panel at the Commission on the Status of Women, “Human Rights and Trafficking in Persons: Empowering Women to Address Poverty”. The panel will be held Tuesday, March 15, 2016 at 6:15 PM in midtown Manhattan. More information to follow soon. To reserve a ticket, please click here.

New Report Highlights Impact of Legal Services on Human Trafficking Survivors

The City Bar Justice Center’s Immigrant Women & Children Project (IWC) has released a report examining how legal services have helped clients change their lives. For the report, the IWC interviewed a sample of 50 current and former IWC clients, all of whom are survivors of trafficking.

The report affirms that receiving legal services is key to help­ing survivors of trafficking pursue their dreams of education, gainful employment, and family reunification where possible. The report outlines the types of legal services provided, current immigration status, and the number of clients that pursued education after receiving IWC’s assistance, among other data.

IWC assists low-income survivors of violent crimes, including inti­mate-partner violence, trafficking, sexual assault, child abuse, and hate crimes. IWC represents adults and children in immigration matters with the goal of promoting better access to safety, stability, and self-sufficiency.

The report may be viewed here.

 

Human Trafficking and Racial Justice

New York Anti-Trafficking Network’s own Juhu Thukral has a new piece in the Huffington Post on Human Trafficking and Racial Justice in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

“Consistent waves of media cover the issue of human trafficking, and it’s attained a fairly mainstream level of attention. So much so that January is now known as National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, or as Human Trafficking Awareness Month. More people are learning about trafficking and understand it involves people in vulnerable situations experiencing coercion in their work. At its most basic, trafficking is about people living and working in a climate of fear, not free to leave exploitative and dangerous working conditions”. To read more, please go here.

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