#TalkTraffic: Survivors Sharing Their Voices

This is the fourth video in our 8-part #TalkTraffic video series. See Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Survivors of trafficking move on to reclaim their lives in so many different ways. The trafficking experience is not a core piece of their identity. Learn more about how survivors can share their voices while protecting their privacy.

What You Need To Know

For most survivors of trafficking, the trafficking experience does not define them. Remembering this helps when thinking about the most respectful ways to work with survivors who are sharing their voices.

Especially because the media and some well-intentioned policymakers are largely focused on horrific stories and salacious angles, the most important concept is Informed Consent:

  • Talk to survivors about possible legal and emotional consequences for sharing their stories and make sure their stories are anonymous, if that’s what the survivor wants.
  • Be straightforward about why and how you’re working with a survivor to share his or her story, and do not take the experience out of context, in the hopes of winning a particular policy or campaign.
  • Remind survivors about how long stories live on the internet and how widely stories can be shared through social media and websites, since this can have legal or emotional consequences.

The best ways to work together include:

  • Ask survivors what their needs are, and help to highlight their voices in the ways they want to share.
  • Connect survivors to qualified and appropriate legal and social services. This helps address potential legal consequences of sharing their voice, and deals with the potential trauma of telling parts of their story.
  • Encourage survivors to suggest solutions to prevent and end trafficking, and to collaborate and organize with other activists and concerned members of the community. There’s no need to re-live the details of abuse, since that information doesn’t help in preventing or ending trafficking.

Share this video: youtu.be/8EqceUNVjY8

Connect with us! nyatn.org | @NYATN | #TalkTraffic | Facebook

See the whole #TalkTraffic video project.

Learn more about what you can do to help.

Production Credits — Producers: Juhu Thukral and Jeffrey Yamaguchi. Video Production/Filming/Editing: Jordan Timpy and Cassie Timpy of Agape Visuals (Read their write-up about working on this project). Music: Broke For Free.

#TalkTraffic: Human Rights Approach

This is the third video in our 8-part #TalkTraffic video series. See Part 1 | Part 2

Responses to trafficking involve important human rights issues. Solutions to trafficking that are rooted in human rights respect the dignity and self-determination of the person who may be trafficked. Learn more about what it means to approach trafficking through this lens.

What You Need To Know

It’s absolutely crucial to respond to trafficking using a human rights approach. This means:

  • Respecting the dignity, self-determination, and voice of the person who may be a victim or survivor.
  • Creating an environment where the person at risk is able to make his or her own decisions about the steps he or she wants to take in addressing the situation.
  • Not making assumptions about whether a situation actually involves coercion and trafficking, but instead asking a person you think may be trafficked what kind of help he or she wants and needs.

At times, people feel a strong emotional response when they hear about trafficking, and they want to rush in and try to “rescue” the person they think may be a victim.

  • The problem with this “rescuer” mentality is it takes the focus away from the survivor and puts it on the so-called “rescuer” and his or her point of view.
  • This has a negative consequence: It sidelines the voices of survivors and their ability to make their own decisions and reclaim their own voice, dignity, and ability to move forward in life.
  • If you see a situation that might involve trafficking, call a qualified and trusted organization that works with trafficking survivors and they can help foster a human rights approach and expertly navigate the possibilities for helping a person at risk.

Arrest is never an appropriate way to try to help someone who may be a trafficking survivor.

  • Arresting people who may be trafficked only drives them further into vulnerable situations.
  • Arrests create trauma, chaos, and unintended consequences in a person’s life (for example, affecting their family, children, and co-workers.)
  • Arrest also adds an additional layer of complex legal consequences into that person’s already complicated and difficult situation.

Share this video: youtu.be/aoe1xIokMwM

Connect with us! nyatn.org | @NYATN | #TalkTraffic | Facebook

See the whole #TalkTraffic video project.

Learn more about what you can do to help.

Production Credits — Producers: Juhu Thukral and Jeffrey Yamaguchi. Video Production/Filming/Editing: Jordan Timpy and Cassie Timpy of Agape Visuals (Read their write-up about working on this project). Music: Broke For Free.

#TalkTraffic: What Is Trafficking?

This is the second video in our 8-part #TalkTraffic video series. See the first video here.

When a person is trafficked, she or he experiences some type of force, fraud, or coercion in work, usually in low-wage industries. It’s important to understand what trafficking looks like, so we can give people the help they need and want. Learn more about the dynamics of trafficking in persons.

What You Need To Know

Trafficking can include a wide range of experiences. It’s important to recognize the different dynamics, so we can properly recognize it and work with survivors to create the best solutions.

  • Trafficking happens most often in low-wage industries like construction, domestic work, sex work, agriculture, and restaurants.
  • People particularly at risk for being trafficked include recent immigrants; homeless, street-involved, and LGBTQ youth; and people in desperate economic circumstances.
    Trafficking involves people living and working in a climate of fear. This means:

  • Force, fraud, or coercion in their work.
  • Isolation, invisibility, abuse of power, physical and/or sexual abuse.
    There are many different legal definitions of trafficking:

  • Most countries, states within the United States, and the United Nations all have their own legal definitions of trafficking.
    The definitions vary, but they are consistent in noting trafficking involves:

  • Exploitation of people involved in many different kinds of labor, including sex work and domestic work; and
  • The use of force, fraud, or coercion in making people work.

Trafficking gets attention because it can be horrific and it lends itself to upsetting visual images. But there’s a wide range of abuses people experience in their work — sometimes these involve trafficking and sometimes they don’t. And we still need to address this wide range of abuses in order to ensure opportunity, dignity, and human rights for all people.

Share this video: youtu.be/q6FFRTpyf2o

Connect with us! nyatn.org | @NYATN | #TalkTraffic | Facebook

See the whole video project.

Learn more about what you can do to help.

Production Credits — Producers: Juhu Thukral and Jeffrey Yamaguchi. Video Production/Filming/Editing: Jordan Timpy and Cassie Timpy of Agape Visuals. Music: Broke For Free.

Hear from Jordan and Cassie of Agape Visuals about working with us, and about the adventures of their missional year.

Introducing Our #TalkTraffic Video Series

We’re thrilled to officially announce our #TalkTraffic project — an 8-part video series we’re launching to bring about more awareness to the effort to end trafficking. In this first video, we introduce NYATN and explain our approach to the work that we do. Our featured experts — lawyers, social workers, and policy advocates — take on trafficking from different disciplines, and offer up a variety of insights on ways to engage and solve this urgent and important human rights issue.

What You Need To Know

Goals of anti-trafficking work include:

  • Supporting the dignity and self-determination of survivors.
  • Giving survivors the help they need to reclaim their voice and their lives.
  • Preventing and ending trafficking.

It takes a lot of different kinds of expertise and knowledge to give trafficking survivors the help they want and need:

  • Well-trained lawyers.
  • Social workers who really understand survivors’ needs.
  • Advocates and activists working from a human rights approach.
  • Collaboration, respect, and listening to survivors is key!

Share this video — https://youtu.be/IvFe0UWgn_s Connect with us! nyatn.org | @NYATN | #TalkTraffic | Facebook

See the whole video project.

Learn more about what you can do to help.

Production Credits — Producers: Juhu Thukral and Jeffrey Yamaguchi. Video Production/Filming/Editing: Jordan Timpy and Cassie Timpy of Agape Visuals. Music: Broke For Free.

Hear from Jordan and Cassie of Agape Visuals about working with us, and about the adventures of their missional year.

UN Session on the Commission on the Status of Women: Current Challenges in Combating Human Trafficking

Updated 3.16.15

NYATN will present parallel event, “Current Challenges in Combating Human Trafficking 20 Years After the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action,” at the United Nations 59th Session on the Commission on the Status of Women. Twenty years after the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, human trafficking continues to be pervasive around the world. Women and girls, in particular, are vulnerable to human trafficking in a variety of sectors, and they experience coercion, abuse, and a climate of fear in their work. This panel will feature discussion by anti-trafficking experts as they examine the challenges in implementation of human rights-based, long-term actions by governments, NGOs, and other stakeholders. Particular attention will be paid to current anti-trafficking strategies in the U.S., including around prostitution and commercial sex, from a human rights perspective. Speakers:

  • MARY CAPARAS, New York Asian Women’s Center
  • KATE MOGULESCU, Legal Aid Society
  • KATE SHEILL, Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women
  • IVY SURIYOPAS, Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund

March 14, 2015 at 12:30 pm Church Center, 777 UN Plaza, 8th Fl., Boss Room Space is limited.  Please RSVP to register. Cosponsors with NYATN include: Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, City Bar Justice Center, Legal Aid Society, New York Asian Women’s Center, The Seltzer Firm, and Sex Workers Project at Urban Justice Center Previous CSW Parallel Events include:

NYATN Testifies About Human Trafficking and Domestic Workers for NYC Council

NYATN members from Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, City Bar Justice Center, New York Asian Women’s Center, and Sex Workers Project at Urban Justice Center testified for the New York City Council on Friday, February 27, 2015 on, “Labor Trafficking in the Domestic Worker Industry – Resources for Victims in New York City (video).”

NYATN member Sex Workers Project's Crystal DeBoise (center) testifies alongside Legal Aid's Hollis Pfitsch and Catholic Migration Services's Alice Davis

NYATN member Sex Workers Project’s Crystal DeBoise (center) testifies alongside Legal Aid’s Hollis Pfitsch and Catholic Migration Services’s Alice Davis

View text of testimony of Ivy O. Suriyopas, NYATN steering member.  Suzanne Tomatore, a founder of NYATN and steering member, also provided testimony.  View full video testimony.

NYATN to Speak at Seton Hall Legislative Journal Symposium

The Seton Hall Legislative Journal (Vol. 39) invites you to attend its annual Symposium, which will reflect on the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment and whether or not U.S. legislation is living up to the amendment with respect to modern-day forms of slavery.

Distinguished panelists will explore the root causes of human trafficking and its impact on different groups, as well as analyze and assess legislative responses to trafficking in its various forms. The event will culminate with a keynote dinner at the Newark Club.

Confirmed speakers include:

Wanda Akin and Raymond Brown
Founders, International Justice Project

Shana Chen
Assistant United States Attorney, District of New Jersey

Sophia Lane
New Jersey Statewide Coordinator, Polaris Project

Beth Lyon
Director, Farmworker Legal Aid Clinic, Villanova Univ. School of Law

Sarah Plastino
Supervising Attorney for Pro Bono Programs, Kids In Need of Defense

Kelly Sandler
Assistant Prosecutor, Essex County Prosecutor’s Office

Ivy Suriyopas
Director, Anti-Trafficking Initiative, Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund

Thursday, February 26, 2015
2:30 – 8 p.m. | Registration begins at 2:30 p.m. and event begins at 3 p.m.
4 NY & NJ CLE Credits

AGENDA/ITINERARY

2:30 to 3:00 pm – Registration

3:00 to 4:30 pm – Panel 1: The Faces of Human Trafficking

4:30 to 4:45 pm – Break

4:45 to 6:00 pm – Panel 2: The Efficacy of Legislative Responses to Human Trafficking

6:00 to 8:00 pm – Dinner & Keynote – The Newark Club

 

Tickets: $50 per person (Refund Policy)
Complimentary to Seton Hall Law Students and Seton Hall Law faculty. Register here.

 

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