#TalkTraffic: Solutions to End Trafficking

July 27, 2015 Comments off

This is the seventh video in our 8-part #TalkTraffic video series. See Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6

Our goal is to end trafficking, and to prevent it from happening in the first place. We also want to help survivors reclaim their voices and their lives. This video delves into the solutions we need that will put an end to trafficking.

What You Need To Know

At NY Anti-Trafficking Network, we focus on helping survivors reclaim their voices and their lives, but we are also working to prevent and end trafficking at the root causes. Prevention is key – and therefore requires taking on the issues that lead people to the vulnerable situations that put them at risk for trafficking in the first place.

These are the long-term solutions we are working toward and calling for:

  • Safe and affordable housing.
  • Supportive and qualified legal and social services.
  • Commonsense immigration policy.
  • Living wage jobs, opportunities to build financial assets, and anti-poverty policies.
  • Supporting low-wage workers organizing for their rights.
  • Sexuality education, which survivors say would have helped them navigate vulnerable situations.
  • Reduce reliance on the criminal justice system and remove heavy oversight by law enforcement.
  • Safe, qualified, and appropriate services and housing for LGBTQ young people, especially those at risk for homelessness and/or family rejection.
  • Promoting a global culture that values women and girls.
  • Protecting fair working conditions and labor rights.
  • Protecting human rights.
  • Transparency and accountability in supply chains for goods and services.

If you do any of this work, you are doing important anti-trafficking work.

Share this video: youtu.be/HSak84Jtd84

Connect with us! nyatn.org | @NYATN | #TalkTraffic | Facebook

See the whole #TalkTraffic video project.

Learn more about what you can do to help.

Production Credits — Producers: Juhu Thukral and Jeffrey Yamaguchi. Video Production/Filming/Editing: Jordan Timpy and Cassie Timpy of Agape Visuals (Read their write-up about working on this project). Music: Broke For Free.

#TalkTraffic: The Importance of Legal Services for Trafficking Survivors

July 20, 2015 Comments off

This is the sixth video in our 8-part #TalkTraffic video series. See Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5

Survivors of trafficking need a wide range of legal services. It takes expert legal knowledge and experience to work with a survivor as he or she moves through immigration, criminal justice, housing, civil litigation, or family law issues. This video explains how survivors can work with their lawyers on navigating different legal systems.

What You Need To Know

Properly trained lawyers are a critical part of a trafficking survivor’s support team. Expert and qualified lawyers work to protect survivors’ legal rights, which helps people re-gain their own voice and make decisions about how they want to move forward with their lives.

Lawyers who understand the dynamics of trafficking can help survivors tell their stories in a safe way that protects their legal rights and gets them the help they need and deserve. This means:

  • Listening to survivors explain their understanding of their own experience.
  • Helping survivors figure out what they want from different legal systems and what their goals are, so the survivor can decide how he or she wants to move forward.

For this reason, lawyers working with trafficking survivors or people at risk should be qualified to provide appropriate legal services, and have the necessary training and expertise in this work. They should also be able to provide linguistically and culturally appropriate legal services.

    Trafficking survivors have a wide range of complex legal needs:

  • Immigration.
  • Housing.
  • Civil litigation.
  • Family law.
  • Child protection system.
  • Criminal justice.

Within the criminal justice system, survivors’ legal needs include:

  • Criminal defense, where a survivor has been arrested, often multiple times.
  • Essentially erasing the criminal convictions from a survivor’s criminal record (from prior arrests) so he or she can find future employment and safe housing.
  • Protecting a survivor’s rights and interests as he or she cooperates with law enforcement and prosecutors against a trafficker, if the survivor decides to do so.

Lawyers need to remember, each survivor has a different approach to what he or she wants and needs in order to move forward. Listening and supporting the survivor’s self-determination is key!

Share this video: youtu.be/jJCcifh__U4

Connect with us! nyatn.org | @NYATN | #TalkTraffic | Facebook

See the whole #TalkTraffic video project.

Learn more about what you can do to help.

Production Credits — Producers: Juhu Thukral and Jeffrey Yamaguchi. Video Production/Filming/Editing: Jordan Timpy and Cassie Timpy of Agape Visuals (Read their write-up about working on this project). Music: Broke For Free.

#TalkTraffic: The Approach to Social Services for Trafficking Survivors

July 13, 2015 Comments off

This is the fifth video in our 8-part #TalkTraffic video series. See Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4

It’s crucial for survivors of trafficking to work with trained social workers who can help them navigate different systems and opportunities that can support them in moving forward. This video delves into the kinds of services qualified social workers can provide trafficking survivors.

What You Need To Know

Qualified and trained social workers are a critical part of a trafficking survivor’s support team. Social workers can help survivors create the space they need to re-gain their own voice and make decisions about how they want to move forward with their lives.

  • Social workers are obligated to listen to what survivors want and meet them where they’re at, which is a key principle of social work.
  • For this reason, social workers should be qualified to provide services, and have the necessary training and expertise in this work. They should also be able to provide linguistically and culturally appropriate services.
  • Qualified social workers offer a wide range of services: Access to public benefits; Job training and employment; Finding housing; Therapy; and Managing details of everyday life that may be different from a survivor’s home country, like learning how to take the subway or drive a car!
  • Social services need to be tailored to the different needs of different survivors: young people, immigrants, LGBTQ people, men, women, and people from a variety of cultures and who speak different languages.

Share this video: youtu.be/Xo45D1cAW8U

Connect with us! nyatn.org | @NYATN | #TalkTraffic | Facebook

See the whole #TalkTraffic video project.

Learn more about what you can do to help.

Production Credits — Producers: Juhu Thukral and Jeffrey Yamaguchi. Video Production/Filming/Editing: Jordan Timpy and Cassie Timpy of Agape Visuals (Read their write-up about working on this project). Music: Broke For Free.

#TalkTraffic: Survivors Sharing Their Voices

This is the fourth video in our 8-part #TalkTraffic video series. See Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Survivors of trafficking move on to reclaim their lives in so many different ways. The trafficking experience is not a core piece of their identity. Learn more about how survivors can share their voices while protecting their privacy.

What You Need To Know

For most survivors of trafficking, the trafficking experience does not define them. Remembering this helps when thinking about the most respectful ways to work with survivors who are sharing their voices.

Especially because the media and some well-intentioned policymakers are largely focused on horrific stories and salacious angles, the most important concept is Informed Consent:

  • Talk to survivors about possible legal and emotional consequences for sharing their stories and make sure their stories are anonymous, if that’s what the survivor wants.
  • Be straightforward about why and how you’re working with a survivor to share his or her story, and do not take the experience out of context, in the hopes of winning a particular policy or campaign.
  • Remind survivors about how long stories live on the internet and how widely stories can be shared through social media and websites, since this can have legal or emotional consequences.

The best ways to work together include:

  • Ask survivors what their needs are, and help to highlight their voices in the ways they want to share.
  • Connect survivors to qualified and appropriate legal and social services. This helps address potential legal consequences of sharing their voice, and deals with the potential trauma of telling parts of their story.
  • Encourage survivors to suggest solutions to prevent and end trafficking, and to collaborate and organize with other activists and concerned members of the community. There’s no need to re-live the details of abuse, since that information doesn’t help in preventing or ending trafficking.

Share this video: youtu.be/8EqceUNVjY8

Connect with us! nyatn.org | @NYATN | #TalkTraffic | Facebook

See the whole #TalkTraffic video project.

Learn more about what you can do to help.

Production Credits — Producers: Juhu Thukral and Jeffrey Yamaguchi. Video Production/Filming/Editing: Jordan Timpy and Cassie Timpy of Agape Visuals (Read their write-up about working on this project). Music: Broke For Free.

#TalkTraffic: Human Rights Approach

This is the third video in our 8-part #TalkTraffic video series. See Part 1 | Part 2

Responses to trafficking involve important human rights issues. Solutions to trafficking that are rooted in human rights respect the dignity and self-determination of the person who may be trafficked. Learn more about what it means to approach trafficking through this lens.

What You Need To Know

It’s absolutely crucial to respond to trafficking using a human rights approach. This means:

  • Respecting the dignity, self-determination, and voice of the person who may be a victim or survivor.
  • Creating an environment where the person at risk is able to make his or her own decisions about the steps he or she wants to take in addressing the situation.
  • Not making assumptions about whether a situation actually involves coercion and trafficking, but instead asking a person you think may be trafficked what kind of help he or she wants and needs.

At times, people feel a strong emotional response when they hear about trafficking, and they want to rush in and try to “rescue” the person they think may be a victim.

  • The problem with this “rescuer” mentality is it takes the focus away from the survivor and puts it on the so-called “rescuer” and his or her point of view.
  • This has a negative consequence: It sidelines the voices of survivors and their ability to make their own decisions and reclaim their own voice, dignity, and ability to move forward in life.
  • If you see a situation that might involve trafficking, call a qualified and trusted organization that works with trafficking survivors and they can help foster a human rights approach and expertly navigate the possibilities for helping a person at risk.

Arrest is never an appropriate way to try to help someone who may be a trafficking survivor.

  • Arresting people who may be trafficked only drives them further into vulnerable situations.
  • Arrests create trauma, chaos, and unintended consequences in a person’s life (for example, affecting their family, children, and co-workers.)
  • Arrest also adds an additional layer of complex legal consequences into that person’s already complicated and difficult situation.

Share this video: youtu.be/aoe1xIokMwM

Connect with us! nyatn.org | @NYATN | #TalkTraffic | Facebook

See the whole #TalkTraffic video project.

Learn more about what you can do to help.

Production Credits — Producers: Juhu Thukral and Jeffrey Yamaguchi. Video Production/Filming/Editing: Jordan Timpy and Cassie Timpy of Agape Visuals (Read their write-up about working on this project). Music: Broke For Free.

#TalkTraffic: What Is Trafficking?

This is the second video in our 8-part #TalkTraffic video series. See the first video here.

When a person is trafficked, she or he experiences some type of force, fraud, or coercion in work, usually in low-wage industries. It’s important to understand what trafficking looks like, so we can give people the help they need and want. Learn more about the dynamics of trafficking in persons.

What You Need To Know

Trafficking can include a wide range of experiences. It’s important to recognize the different dynamics, so we can properly recognize it and work with survivors to create the best solutions.

  • Trafficking happens most often in low-wage industries like construction, domestic work, sex work, agriculture, and restaurants.
  • People particularly at risk for being trafficked include recent immigrants; homeless, street-involved, and LGBTQ youth; and people in desperate economic circumstances.
    Trafficking involves people living and working in a climate of fear. This means:

  • Force, fraud, or coercion in their work.
  • Isolation, invisibility, abuse of power, physical and/or sexual abuse.
    There are many different legal definitions of trafficking:

  • Most countries, states within the United States, and the United Nations all have their own legal definitions of trafficking.
    The definitions vary, but they are consistent in noting trafficking involves:

  • Exploitation of people involved in many different kinds of labor, including sex work and domestic work; and
  • The use of force, fraud, or coercion in making people work.

Trafficking gets attention because it can be horrific and it lends itself to upsetting visual images. But there’s a wide range of abuses people experience in their work — sometimes these involve trafficking and sometimes they don’t. And we still need to address this wide range of abuses in order to ensure opportunity, dignity, and human rights for all people.

Share this video: youtu.be/q6FFRTpyf2o

Connect with us! nyatn.org | @NYATN | #TalkTraffic | Facebook

See the whole video project.

Learn more about what you can do to help.

Production Credits — Producers: Juhu Thukral and Jeffrey Yamaguchi. Video Production/Filming/Editing: Jordan Timpy and Cassie Timpy of Agape Visuals. Music: Broke For Free.

Hear from Jordan and Cassie of Agape Visuals about working with us, and about the adventures of their missional year.

Introducing Our #TalkTraffic Video Series

We’re thrilled to officially announce our #TalkTraffic project — an 8-part video series we’re launching to bring about more awareness to the effort to end trafficking. In this first video, we introduce NYATN and explain our approach to the work that we do. Our featured experts — lawyers, social workers, and policy advocates — take on trafficking from different disciplines, and offer up a variety of insights on ways to engage and solve this urgent and important human rights issue.

What You Need To Know

Goals of anti-trafficking work include:

  • Supporting the dignity and self-determination of survivors.
  • Giving survivors the help they need to reclaim their voice and their lives.
  • Preventing and ending trafficking.

It takes a lot of different kinds of expertise and knowledge to give trafficking survivors the help they want and need:

  • Well-trained lawyers.
  • Social workers who really understand survivors’ needs.
  • Advocates and activists working from a human rights approach.
  • Collaboration, respect, and listening to survivors is key!

Share this video — https://youtu.be/IvFe0UWgn_s Connect with us! nyatn.org | @NYATN | #TalkTraffic | Facebook

See the whole video project.

Learn more about what you can do to help.

Production Credits — Producers: Juhu Thukral and Jeffrey Yamaguchi. Video Production/Filming/Editing: Jordan Timpy and Cassie Timpy of Agape Visuals. Music: Broke For Free.

Hear from Jordan and Cassie of Agape Visuals about working with us, and about the adventures of their missional year.

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